Archive for 17/08/2014


Professor Olsen @ Large

On this date, Joseph Priestley began an experiment in which he discovered photosynthesis, although he did not give it that name. He described his experiment in 1772 in a paper entitled “Observations on Different Kinds of Air”:

…I flatter myself that I have accidentally hit upon a method of restoring air which has been injured by the burning of candles, and that I have discovered at least one of the restoratives which nature employs for this purpose. It is vegetation. In what manner this process in nature operates, to produce so remarkable an effect, I do not pretend to have discovered; but a number of facts declare in favour of this hypothesis…

One might have imagined that, since common air is necessary to vegetable, as well as to animal life, both plants and animal had affected it in the same manner, and I own that I had that expectation, when…

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IMG_9516‘Awe-inspiring Anglo-Saxon royal burial site’ is how the National Trust describes Sutton Hoo. I can’t argue with that. I think this must have been my third visit to the site of one of the most important archaeological excavations in Britain. The visit began with the beautifully laid out and richly furnished exhibition building, complete with exquisite reproduction Anglo-Saxon jewelry and a concise, but gripping story of Anglo-Saxon Britain and the discovery of the site in the 1930’s. We went from there (following a light lunch) to explore the mounds which covered burial ships and other graves…..

As the National Trust continues….

‘This hauntingly beautiful 255 acre estate, with far-reaching views over the river Deben, is home to one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time.

Walk around the ancient burial mounds and discover the incredible story of the ship burial of an Anglo-Saxon king and his treasured possessions.

Come face to face with your ancestors and explore our award-winning exhibition, the full-size reconstruction of the burial chamber, stunning replica treasures and original finds from one of the mounds, including a prince’s sword.

Look inside the Edwardian house or enjoy the beautiful seasonal colours on our estate walks.’

We did look inside the reopened house of the land owner (Mrs. Pretty) who commissioned the 1930’s ‘dig’ – a welcome addition to the route and which provided another dimension to the visit; complete with live 1930’s piano music being played  (and requests too).

Further information;

National Trust website

Wikipedia

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