Archive for 04/01/2015


gardeninacity

We visited the Watts Towers on the Sunday before Christmas. Watts Towers are the remarkable creation of an immigrant tile setter named Simon Rodia, who worked on them from 1921 to about 1954.

Watts Towers from outside south wall. Watts Towers from outside south wall.

There are seventeen towers and other structures on the property, the largest being about 90′ tall.

Watts Towers seen from the adjoining park. Watts Towers seen from the adjoining park.

The towers were created entirely by Rodia using hand tools only. He fashioned them from rebar wrapped in chicken wire and packed with mortar. The rebar he bent by hand, sliding the rods under railroad tracks to hold them steady.

Simon Rodia. Photo from www.wattstowers.us. Simon Rodia. Photo from http://www.wattstowers.us.

He then covered his creations with a mosaic made from all manner of common items – sea shells, broken bottles, odd bits of tiles and ceramics.

Mosaic with glass bottles. Mosaic with glass bottles.

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Rodia also used all kinds of objects to create patterns in the mortar. Rodia also used all kinds of objects to create patterns in the mortar.

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PlayGroundology

Happy New Year from PlayGroundology.

That’s me with the glasses and the big smile, hot off the presses today, as seen and lovingly portrayed by our five-year-old Lila-Jeanne. It’s a pretty good likeness too but I think we’d be safe swapping the dimensions of the head and torso…

Me by LilaPapa by Lila-Jeanne

That’s Lila swinging away in the vid back in the day when she was a wee babe of 9 months. It was shortly after she was born that I started down the PlayGroundology road. I was home at the time on parental leave. Hanging together for 9 months is one of the greatest gifts our little family has ever experienced.

Nearly five years later, PlayGroundology is a journey that’s still fresh. It seems that there is always something to discover in the world of play whether it’s old and overlooked, or new and untried.

Although I’ve been writing…

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6934950_origOne more extract from a book I bought in a charity shop in the summer (apologies for the gender stereotyping)…..

The Basic law of Weedlock:

The best training for gardening is marriage.

corollaries;

1. Behind every successful gardener is an astonished woman.

2. About the only way to get a gardener nowadays is to marry one.

3. Gardening is a process by which a man finds out what sort of husband his wife thinks she ought to have married.

Every Wife’s Lament:

Gardening expands to exclude all more interesting possibilities.

Law of The Unwelcome Arrival of Spring:

There is nothing so harrowing to the soul of the average married man as the first growth of lawn grass.

lawn-mower-manFrom : ‘Mrs. Murphy’s Laws of Gardening’ – Faith Hines (Temple House books, 1992)

Old School Gardener

 

Daniel Greenwood

The language of leaves

Alphabet Ravine

Lydia Rae Bush Poetry

TIME GENTS

Australian Pub Project

Vanha Talo Suomi

a harrowing journey of home improvement

How I Killed Betty!

The Diary and blog on How to Tackle Depression and Anxiety!

Bits & Tidbits

RANDOM BITS & MORE TIDBITS

Rambling in the Garden

.....and nurturing my soul

The Interpretation Game

Cultural Heritage and the Digital Economy

pbmGarden

Sense of place, purpose, rejuvenation and joy

SISSINGHURST GARDEN

Notes from the Gardeners...

Deep Green Permaculture

Connecting People to Nature, Empowering People to Live Sustainably

BloominBootiful

A girl and her garden :)

gwenniesworld

ABOUT MY GARDEN, MY TRAVELS AND ART

Salt of Portugal

all that is glorious about Portugal

The Ramblings of an Aspiring Small Town Girl

Cooking, gardening, fishing, living, laughing.

aristonorganic

"The Best of the Best"

PetalPushin

Thoughts from a professional Petal Pusher

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